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The banner for The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Broadway Musical)

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was a musical released on April 26, 2001 by Broadway[1], performed in the Minskoff Theater[2], that was based off of (though not identical to) the original novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

Along with being one of the first Broadway adaptations of the original book, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer also establishes more diversity and information on otherwise untapped parts of the book series. However, the play's canonicity is debatable, as with all other Broadway musicals and their source's continuity.

Cast Edit

Directed by Scott Ellis[3], The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was choreographed by David Marque and casted with the following:

Synopsis Edit

Note: The Synopsis is an excerpt from Wikipedia, and is available under the Creative Commons Public License.

Act One

In 1840, Tom Sawyer is fishing outside St. Petersburg, Missouri as his friends arrive, and the children play a game of Robin Hood ("Hey, Tom Sawyer"). Tom’s Aunt Polly sends him to school, where he tricks the schoolmaster, Mr. Dobbins, into letting the class have the day off. Aunt Polly, Mr. Dobbins and the preacher, Reverend Sprague lament that they "can’t do a thing about the boy".

That Saturday, Aunt Polly orders Tom to whitewash a fence in front of their house, and Tom’s half-brother, Sid, is happy. Frustrated, Tom plans to run away (Here’s My Plan).

Finn and Tom (2001 Musical)

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn meet.

As Tom procrastinates, he meets a beautiful newcomer, Becky Thatcher and they are mutually attracted. The town's outcast and Tom's best friend Huckleberry Finn appears, and arranges for the two of them to meet at the local graveyard that night so that Huck can "cure his warts." Huck remarks that painting the fence looks like fun, and Tom then swindles his friends into painting the fence for him after having them trade their valuables. ("Smart Like That").

That night, Tom and Huck visit the local graveyard and see Doc Robinson, Muff Potter, and Injun Joe, a "half-breed" troublemaker, robbing a man's grave. ("Hands All Clean"). After a scuffle about ownership of the dead man's watch, Joe murders Doc Robinson and arranges to frame Muff for it. The boys run away and swear in blood to "keep mum forever" about what they saw ("The Vow").

On the way to church, Aunt Polly and Judge Thatcher, single parents, lament about "Raising A Child By Yourself". In church, Tom tries to impress Becky by fooling Reverend Sprague into giving him the "Bible Prize" ("It’s In The Bible").

Tom tries to convince a fearful Huck to learn to read. When Huck saves old Widow Douglas from the advances of the town drunk, she offers to teach him to read and to live in her home. However, Huck declines ("It Just Ain’t Me").

That day, in school, the girls are gossiping over a book of poetry that Becky found that belongs to Mr. Dobbins, the teacher. When Mr. Dobbins enters, the girls panic and drop the book. When Mr. Dobbins is teaching, he discovers the book on the ground and angrily interrogates the students about who took it. When he is about to get Becky to confess, Tom lies and says he took the book. Before Tom can be punished, the Sheriff calls Dobbins away, needing a coroner after discovering Doc Robinson's body. Tom and Becky proclaim their undying love for each other ("To Hear You Say My Name").

Muff Potter is arrested for murder, and he pleads with Injun Joe to save him from hanging. Joe agrees to help, but wants a map that Muff has found: a map leading to a treasure, Murrell’s Gold. ("Murrel's Gold") After Joe leaves and Muff is taken away, Tom expresses his wish to tell everyone what really happened in the graveyard, but Huck says that if he does, they'll both surely be killed by Injun Joe, and Tom would be breaking their vow. ("Murrell's Gold Reprise")

At Muff Potter’s trial, Tom go through with his plan to testify. He tells the truth and swears that Injun Joe committed the murder. Injun Joe yells "You are dead, boy!", throws a knife at Tom, and runs from the courtroom, being chased by the Sheriff ("The Testimony").

Act Two

As school ends for the summer, the children celebrate, but their parents remind them that they have chores and that they "can't just sit and twiddle [their] thumbs" ("Ain’t Life Fine"). Huck tells Tom that Injun Joe has returned, and Tom tells Aunt Polly that he won't be attending the annual town picnic. Aunt Polly tries to convince him to go, and then tells him she'll still love him. ("This Time Tomorrow") After weeks of secret tutoring by Widow Douglas, Huck finally learns how to read and they celebrate ("I Can Read").

At the annual town picnic the festivities start with the exploration of McDougal’s Cave. As the town people go to the cave, Injun Joe makes his presence known to Muff, wanting to know where he found the map. After a violent interrogation, Muff reveals to Joe that the map came from the cave. Injun Joe states that he will go into the cave to find Murrell’s Gold ("Murrell's Gold Reprise Act Two"). As the children explore the cave, Tom takes Becky to a hidden part of the cave. As they explore, Tom and Becky realize they are lost; Aunt Polly and Judge Thatcher, with the rest of the town people, frantically search for them ("Angels Lost").

Underground, as Tom and Becky seek a way out of the cave, Tom comforts Becky after telling her they are on their last candle.("Light"). Tom uses a reel of kite string to look for a way out while Becky can rest. As Becky prays to God that they will be found ("Angels Lost Reprise"), Injun Joe grabs Becky, but Tom jumps out from behind a rock and fights him off until Huck arrives. The three friends all come together to fight Injun Joe, which ends with Tom accidentally stabbing Joe in the chest, leading Joe to stumble into a ravine to his death. The shaken children find Murrell’s Gold and see daylight shining through a crack in the wall. They escape from the cave, finally safe.

As the people of St. Petersburg hold a funeral service for the lost children ("Light Reprise") Tom, Huck and Becky limp into town. They realize that they’re watching their own funeral. The children are discovered and the town people are wild with happiness ("Ain’t Life Fine Reprise"). Huck tells Tom that he can read, and the two friends join the celebration ("Finale").

Characters Edit

Tom Sawyer Edit

Our story's title character. A boy on the verge of manhood full of mischief and hope, suffering greatly from the pangs of growing up. He is very likable, intelligent, intuitive and carefree.

Gender: Male

Age: 12 to 14

Vocal range top: A4

Vocal range bottom: A2

Huckleberry Finn Edit

Tom's best friend. He is stubborn, loyal, proud, and good-natured. Lives a life of free will and enjoys it that way.

Gender: Male

Age: 12 to 15

Vocal range top: A4

Vocal range bottom: C3

Sidney Sawyer Edit

Tom's half-brother and an insufferable goody-goody who dislikes Tom and does everything he can to get him into trouble.

Gender: Male

Age: 10 to 13

Vocal range top: A5

Vocal range bottom: E4

Ben Rogers Edit

The ringleader of Tom's classmates. He is not as mischievous as Tom, but still a typical boy on the verge of manhood. Slightly jealous of Tom in an idolizing manner.

Gender: Male

Age: 12 to 15

Vocal range top: A5

Vocal range bottom: B3

Becky Thatcher Edit

An utterly beautiful woman. Bright, smart, youthful, and funny. She is the new girl in town and falls for Tom instantly.

Gender: Female

Age: 12 to 15

Vocal range top: F5

Vocal range bottom: B3

Judge Josiah Thatcher Edit

Becky's father. A widower trying to raise a girl as best he can. He is handsome and craggy.

Gender: Male

Age: 40 to 50

Vocal range top: F4

Vocal range bottom: A2

Lemuel Dobbins Edit

The schoolmaster and village demagogue. Prides himself on being strict but has a soft, poetic side as well.

Gender: Male

Age: 25 to 45

Vocal range top: E4

Vocal range bottom: B2

Reverend Joshua Sprague Edit

Eagle-eyed and severe. He is the village Reverend. Stately and poised preaching with a 'fire and brimstone' mindset, full of passion and verve.

Gender: Male

Age: 40 to 50

Vocal range top: E4

Vocal range bottom: B2

Injun Joe Edit

A proud, bitter, downtrodden man whose sharp face and hollow cheeks makes him look like death himself. Half Indian and half white, he has been treated with contempt his whole life. He now has a heart as black as wood smoke.

Gender: Male

Age: 40 to 50

Vocal range top: E4

Vocal range bottom: D3

Muff Potter Edit

A vagrant and derelict drunk. Not a bad man, he just doesn't have the backbone to say no when others lead him astray.

Gender: Male

Age: 60 to 70

Vocal range top: E4

Vocal range bottom: D3

Doc Robinson Edit

A pompous, unpleasant man with a chip on his shoulder. He is bossy, thieving, and impatient. An all around "bad guy."

Gender: Male

Age: 45 to 55

Vocal range top: F4

Vocal range bottom: E3

Aunt Polly Edit

Tom's Aunt. She tries to discipline and keep him in line but is at her wit's end. Ever so patient, she loves both Tom and Sid and does her best to single-handedly take care of them both.

Gender: Female

Age: 40 to 50

Vocal range top: E5

Vocal range bottom: E3

Widow Douglas Edit

A pretty, older woman of some wealth. Kind-hearted and giving, she offers Huck a home with a bed and cooked meals.

Gender: Female

Age: 60 to 70

Vocal range top: E5

Vocal range bottom: A3

Ensemble Edit

Friends (Joe, George, Lyle, Alfred); Schoolmates (Amy Lawrence, Lucy Harper, Sabrina Temple, Susie Rogers); Townsmen

Songs Edit

Act I
  • "Overture: Civilization" - Orchestra
  • "Hey, Tom Sawyer" - Tom Sawyer, Aunt Polly, Lemuel Dobbins, Reverend Sprague, and the People of St. Petersburg
  • "Here's My Plan" - Tom Sawyer
  • "Smart Like That" - Tom Sawyer, Ben Rogers, Huckleberry Finn, and Boys
  • "Hands All Clean" - Injun Joe and Doctor Robinson
  • "The Vow" - Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn
  • "Raising A Child" - Aunt Polly and Judge Thatcher
  • "Old Hundred" - Ensemble
  • "In The Bible" - Tom Sawyer, Reverend Sprague, and Ensemble
  • "It Just Ain't Me" - Huckleberry Finn
  • "To Hear You Say My Name" - Tom Sawyer and Becky Thatcher
  • "Murrell's Gold" - Injun Joe, Muff Potter, Tom Sawyer, and Huckleberry Finn
  • "The Testimony" - Tom Sawyer and Ensemble
Act II
  • "Entr'acte" - Orchestra
  • "Ain't Life Fine" - Company
  • "This Time Tomorrow" - Aunt Polly
  • "I Can Read" - Huckleberry Finn and Widow Douglas
  • "Murrell's Gold" (Reprise) - Injun Joe
  • "Angels Lost" - Aunt Polly, Judge Thatcher, and the People of St. Petersburg
  • "Light" - Tom Sawyer
  • "Angels Lost" (Reprise) - Becky Thatcher
  • "Light" (Reprise) - People of St. Petersburg
  • "Finale" - Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, Becky Thatcher, and Ensemble

Awards and Nominations Edit

Theatre World Award[10] Winner

  • 2001 Outstanding New Performer (Joshua Park)

Tony Award[11] Nominees

  • Lighting Designer (Kenneth Posner)
  • Scenic Designer (Heidi Ettinger)

Drama Desk Award[12] nominees

  • Outstanding Orchestrations (Michael Starobin)
  • Outstanding Set Design of a Musical (Heidi Ettinger)
  • Outstanding Costume Design (Anthony Powell)
  • Outstanding Lighting Design (Kenneth Posner)

See also: Edit

References Edit

  1. Wikipedia: Broadway
  2. Wikipedia: Minskoff Theatre
  3. Wikipedia: Scott Ellis
  4. Wikipedia: Joshua Park
  5. Wikipedia: Kristen Bell
  6. Wikipedia: Tom Aldredge
  7. Wikipedia: Jane Connell
  8. Wikipedia: John Dossett
  9. Wikipedia: Kevin Durand
  10. Wikipedia: Theatre World Award
  11. Wikipedia: Tony Award
  12. Wikipedia: Drama Desk Award